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Apr 2014

05 April 2014; the law is there to Protect, Part 2.

The current situation with international law as far as it concerns the seafarer has made it in a way easier; but also more difficult. The addition of MLC 2006, which you can call the human element in the whole scheme, has brought separated rules. With the result that obscure laws and scattered regulations were brought together in one frame work.  Which is really great as we can now find it, and we know if it really pertains to us or not.  The other side of the coin is that now we have this frame work, there can be compliance and thus it will be audited. Resulting in extra work on the ship, and thus also for the captain. Of course we have a system for this. Solas, with safety at sea, pertains to all on board but once it comes to implementation on Board, it is mostly the deck department who takes the lead.  This because it is most closely connected to the Captain, it has grown that way. The Staff Captain makes the drill and the inspection schedules and with it rolls all the three departments.  The Masters function apart from being involved is to ensure that the standards are being met. Marpol, has basically to do with pollution and the prevention thereof. Most of what can cause pollution comes through the engine spaces. Exhausts, grey water, black water and as recycling is part of the engineering team, the emphasis is here on the Chief Engineer. The Master keeps oversight by means of inspections and signing off on the paperwork. SCTW: certification for all crew on board with requirements which vary from function to function.  This is for 99% looked after by the Home Office. They ensure that when a crewmember comes to the ship, he/she is fully qualified to do the job assigned. The Master has to verify that the crewmember, when boarding, has indeed these qualifications. MLC 2006. Anything to do with labor and life on board. Again the Home office has to ensure that everything is setup properly and the ships can sail accordingly. But as […]

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